Vivian Maier Street Photographer Book Review

Posted By blauereiter der on March 31st, 2014

Vivian Maier Street Photographer Book

In 2007, a Chicago historian named John Maloof purchased a cache of negatives at an auction house as research materials for a local history book he was working on. Upon developing them, Maloof discovered they were a spectacular collection of exceptional pictures taken by a completely unknown and highly private photographer named Vivian Maier.

Since then, tens of thousands of her pictures have been rediscovered to reveal an amazingly talented photographer who documented the streets and lives of Chicago. This book contains a select collection of those pictures. Vivian Maier passed away in 2009.

Vivian Maier Street Photographer Book
Vivian Maier Street Photographer Book
Vivian Maier Street Photographer Book
Vivian Maier Street Photographer Book
Vivian Maier Street Photographer Book
Vivian Maier Street Photographer Book
Vivian Maier Street Photographer Book
Vivian Maier Street Photographer Book
Vivian Maier Street Photographer Book
Vivian Maier Street Photographer Book
Vivian Maier Street Photographer Book
Vivian Maier Street Photographer Book

(above & below) Vivian Maier also enjoyed taking pictures of herself, often via mirrors and reflective surfaces.

Vivian Maier Street Photographer Book
Vivian Maier Street Photographer Book

The Zeitgeist of the streets of old Chicago, as seen through the eyes of an intriguing and highly accomplished photographer.

Vivian Maier Street Photographer Book Details :

- Dimensions – 11.1 x 10.1 x 0.8 inches
- Hard cover, 136 pages
- B&W, English.

Vivian Maier Street Photographer Book Amazon Buy Link

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5 Responses to “Vivian Maier Street Photographer Book Review”

alua

I just recently heard of Vivian Maier when the Slate published a piece about her. It was actually a terrible article (the selection of photographs and the text were completely underwhelming, not really managing to show at all why Maier is exceptional, but giving the impression that her work was appreciated only because it was b&w images from another time). Fortunately, I clicked on a link to a website dedicated to her, which gave me a much better idea of her work.

Lots of wonderful stuff – she had a great eye for ‘moments’. I particularly enjoy her self-portraits, which are so different from the current-day fad of selfies. I love how complex she made many of them, often so that she is merely one of the objects in the photograph and always narrating a larger story.

guybrush threepwood

oh yes that’s wonderful stuff !

yonghow

alua – I feel exactly the same way about her “selfies”, she fits aesthetically into the composition of the pictures and doesn’t just shout “Look at me !”

alua

It’s a bit sad that no one has taken the selfie fad to make something inspiring, creative and/or clever out of it (as much as I have seen, since I pretty much tend to ignore all those selfies).

I rather feel like doing a Vivian Maier inspired self-portrait series myself…..

nick

It’s pretty unique that several people have found large numbers of her negatives (which by the way, they were developed negatives, the step just starting to be taken now is printing them not developing them – or digital imaging for the web) It does make one wonder if some have been lost or all have been found. Very few were printed by her which does lead to questions from an artist standpoint on which ones she would have selected had she exhibited versus how many were looked at and then selected and printed by someone else. Clearly curators and bookmakers are picking ones that grab them as they should but then the public makes assumptions from the selections being made available. I’m sure someone will study them presumably as they are made available.

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